Community Connections | Slay your finals with these awesome study tips

KRYSTAL DODGE | thorn008@rangers.uwp.edu

It is that time of the semester again. We are all struggling to earn good grades and finish the semester strong. There are a variety of things you can do, study tips you can try and resources you can utilize to help you achieve the grades you want and need. Do not let the end of the semester stress get you down.

According to Deloitte Center for Higher Education Excellence, “Nearly one-third of undergraduates leave after their first year, and many require six years to complete their studies.” That seems daunting, but you can be successful!

It is important to get proper sleep, eat healthy, stay hydrated and manage your stress. You can handle your class work and tests. You must allocate your time effectively, develop good study habits and prepare for your tests.

There are many helpful study tips. Cognitive scientists suggest alternating study places and switching between subjects. Forming study groups with your peers and making flash cards are great ways to study. The New York Times reported that consistent testing can help you to relearn information and recall it for your finals, so perhaps all those annoying tests are a good thing.

Effectively using your time is often hard. For each college credit you are taking it is recommended you spend 2 to 3 hours studying per week. Sometimes you have to get creative to fit that all in. Do things like bringing those handy flash cards you made to review in your downtime. Just remember to take breaks as well, because after 90 minutes of studying you will have a hard time focusing. Do not be afraid to take naps, because a sleepy brain is a slow brain.

Test anxiety is a common issue. If you are experiencing test anxiety and it is negatively affecting your performance at school, you should get evaluated. There are accommodations available if you qualify. Some examples of accommodations are extended test time and testing in a quiet room. The Disability Service office is in Wyllie D175 and the phone number is 262-595-2372.

UW-Parkside has help available.  The Parkside Academic Resource Center (PARC) located in Wyllie D180 is open Monday through Friday. The phone number is 262-595-2044. They offer tutoring online as well as in person. They also offer supplemental instruction and student success coaching.

Take a deep breath and try not to get overwhelmed. If you find yourself struggling utilize the resources available. In the words of Franklin D. Roosevelt, “The only limit to our realization of tomorrow will be our doubts of today.

The views expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the official views or opinions of The Ranger News.

Community Connections | Suicide prevention… you are not alone

 

KRYSTAL DODGE | thorn008@rangers.uwp.edu

Suicide does not have a single cause. Substance abuse and untreated depression lead to higher risk of suicide. Having a strong circle and a good support network can help prevent suicide. It is a very complex issue that requires the collaboration of healthcare workers, individuals and their families, treatment services and loved ones.

According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC), suicide is the tenth highest cause of death in the United States for all ages. Approximately 105 people die by suicide daily, and suicide takes the lives of 38,000 Americans a year. The highest rates of suicide among Americans are in Whites, Native Americans, and Alaskan Natives. There is 1 successful suicide for every 25 suicide attempts, and that increases to 1 successful suicide for every 4 attempts in the elderly. The National Alliance of Mental Illness (NAMI) states that only half of people experiencing a major depressive episode receive treatment.

Warning signs

According to the Suicide Awareness Voices of Education, there are warning signs to look out for: talking about wanting to die or to kill oneself, about feeling hopeless or having no purpose, feeling trapped or being in unbearable pain or worrying about being  a burden to others. Other things to watch for are increased substance use, withdrawing, extreme mood swings, sleep changes and recklessness. These are all acute signs. If you observe these signs in yourself or someone else, you should seek help. You can call 911 or go to the hospital. You can also call Lifeline (USA) at 800-273-8255 OR Text SIGNS to 741741 for 24/7, anonymous, free crisis counseling. There are many other crisis lines available.

Resources at UW-Parkside

According to the UW-Parkside website, free personal counseling services and referrals are available to all UW-Parkside students. These services are performed by licensed personnel and meet federal guidelines. There is both individual and group counseling available for a wide variety of things.

These services are free and confidential, and this means the information will not and cannot legally be shared without your written permission. You can call to set up a counseling session at (262) 595-2366. If you have an emergency, you may call the UW-Parkside police at (262) 595-2911.

If you or someone you know are feeling suicidal or depressed, please seek help. There is hope. According to the TAPS study, 80-90 % of Americans who seek treatment for their depression can treat it successfully using therapy and/or medication. In the words of Phil Donahue remember that, “Suicide is a permanent solution to a temporary problem.”