From clavichord to piano

Pianist demonstrates a variety of keyboard music on different historical pianos

IMG_3356
Fumi Nishikori-Nakayama performs on various pianos     COURTESY OF UW-PARKSIDE

TYLER STEINSDORFER

stein078@rangers.uwp.edu

On Friday, Feb. 8 at 12:00 p.m., the UW-Parkside Music Department and the College of Arts and Humanities collaborated to put on the first Noon Concert Series of the semester entitled: “Clavichord to Piano: Keyboard Music through the Ages”. The event was led by Fumi Nishikori-Nakayama, an adjunct faculty member of both the Carthage Music Department and the UW-Parkside Music Department. The event was designed to both show different examples of keyboard music ranging from the 17th century to the 19th century and showing the differences in sound between the original instruments they were written for and a modern-day piano.

Instruments and pieces

Nakayama started the event with showing a piece written for clavichord by William Byrd entitled “All in a Garden Grine”. The clavichord is a striking instrument, making it the “grandfather of the modern piano,” as Nakayama described. The clavichord and the next instrument she showed, the Harpsichord, are both instruments used during the Middle Ages. One major difference between the two instruments, however, is that harpsichord is a plucking instrument instead of a striking instrument. Additionally, the clavichord is not designed for projecting its sound for an entire concert hall like the harpsichord.

The other two keyboards that were shown were the fortepiano and the piano. The fortepiano came into usage in the early 18th century and was used until the 19th century. Compositions by Beethoven and Schubert that were originally made for the fortepiano were played on it to give an insight into how it would have closer sounded for the time period. When discussing the sound of the fortepiano, one member in the audience, Patricia Fish, a piano performance major at UW-Parkside, described that “the fortepiano sounds like you’re listening to a piano in a sewer.” What Patricia was specifically referring to when she said this the tone of the reverb of the fortepiano compared to the piano.

This particular entry in the Noon Concert Series allowed for people to be introduced to pieces of music that they may not normally listen to as a way to possibly expand their taste in music. In addition, playing these pieces on their original instruments let the audience get an idea of what the compositions would have sounded like when there originally written.

Come to the Noon Concert series to support artists, to preserve these musical pieces in the modern moment, and to embrace a musical culture that doesn’t usually get the spotlight.

“Bad Genius”: High risk, high reward

Foreign Film Series hits of spring semester with thrill and high action…about good grades

ROSEMARY SCHWEITZER

schwe035@rangers.uwp.edu

Listen up bitches courtesy of imdb
Lynn explains her final plan to Pat and Grace     COURTESY OF IMDB

Cheating. Most students have either thought of, or actually have cheated on some test at some point in their lives. Those slick enough to get away with it can live freely in anonymity, silently gloating at their success. However, those who are caught are not so lucky. Every few years some college board is under fire for recycling test answers, or having too lax of security measures in their testing rooms. Students who get caught up in these scandals have their test results nullified, are punished by their schools and branded with the moniker of “cheater”. Surprising as it may be, organized cheating rings in Asian countries taking advantage of recycled test forms is a constant issue. “Bad Genius” tackles the strange world of Asian cheating rings in an intense, two hour long, heist-style film.

The heist

Teen genius, Lynn (Chutimon Chuengcharoensukying), aids her best friend Grace (Eisaya Hosuwan) in cheating on a test so her grades will be high enough to audition for the school play. Simple enough, and done with good intentions. A one time thing, right? Unfortunately, things get complicated when Grace brings in her boyfriend, who brings in five friends, who all bring in their friends. Suddenly, Lynn is not only one of the two smartest students in school, but she is revered as something of a crime boss, with dozens of students hanging onto her every word and handsomely paying her for her “tutoring” lessons. But what happens when Lynn takes on more “students”? What happens when the tests get harder, the security stricter, the stakes higher?

Not your typical action flick

Unlike many popular heist-style movies, Lynn is the singular mastermind behind the various plots in the film, making her seem unrealistically intelligent, but she is not the only one. Every single one of the people involved in the cheating ring eventually go to pretty extreme lengths to keep from getting caught, though that can partially be explained by how much is on the line for these students.

Also unlike other heist movies, the various characters of “Bad Genius” do not have the familial relationships that many American viewers are used to seeing in films like “Ocean’s Eleven”, “Mission Impossible” or “Fast and Furious 5”. Their relationship is less akin to friendship and is actually closer to a cut and dry business transaction. They remain loyal to each other under threat of getting caught and, not because they genuinely care for one another.

While many of the characters possess more adult attributes, they are still, at their core, relatable teenagers. The teens of “Bad Genius” are rash, self-centered, self-serving, and manipulative in ways that no teen would ever want to admit they are, and yet it is not hard to see oneself in them. There are students all over the world that would go to extreme lengths to get good grades, be accepted to a good school and prove to the adult world that they are no longer just a “kid”. However unlikely as the specific events of this movie may be, it speaks to something that lies deep within most every young adult: the bad genius we all want to be.

Pat and Grace celebrate passing their test courtesy of imdb
Pat and Grace celebrate passing the STIC      COURTESY OF IMDB

Critical acclaim

The film received much critical acclaim, winning seventeen of its twenty-seven award nominations at various national film festivals, and it is not hard to see why.  The film was largely awarded for the stellar acting of the main cast, as well as the direction and editing of the film. Chutimon Chuengcharoensukying (playing Lynn), is a fashion model making her debut to the big screen in “Bad Genius”, and by her performance it is difficult to believe that she is not a well seasoned actress. Likewise, the rest of the cast is relatively new to the feature film seen, but they all present such riveting performances that one wouldn’t notice at first glance.

“Bad Genius” is an adrenaline packed ride of bad decisions and over-complicated schemes from start to finish and a must-see for any lover of thrilling heists or despiser of standardized tests.

Film series to feature women’s issues

THE RANGER NEWS STAFF

rangernews@uwp.edu

Spotlighting a variety of issues affecting women, a series of free films are screened in the student center at UW-Parkside throughout the semester.

Put together as a collaboration between the Office of Diversity and Inclusion, Campus Activities and Engagement, the Office of Multicultural Student Affairs, Residence Life, and the Ranger Wellness committee.

All films are followed by a short discussion.

Suffragette (106 min., 2015) Tue. March 29, 5pm, Walnut Room: A drama that tracks the story of a working class woman named Maude, among the founding mothers of the feminist movement as it works below the radar under the thumb of an oppressive state after the failure of nonviolent protests. Becoming increasingly revolutionary, they struggle for equity at work and at home. Director: Sarah Gavron.

suffragette-2015-movie-poster

Boy Named Sue (56 min., 2000) – Tue. April 12 5pm, Student Cinema – Theo is a female-to-male transsexual. This film follows his six-year process of becoming a man. Among those affected by his change is his girl friend Lisi who has to deal with what this change means to her. Director: Julie Wyman.

India’s Daughter (62 min., 2015) Wed. April 20 – Noon, Student Cinema – India’s Daughter is the story of the brutal gang rape and murder in Delhi of 23-year-old medical student Jyoti Singh, which sparked protests and serious debate about gender inequality across India. The film documents the coverage of her attack along with the life of Singh, an aspiring doctor who asked her father to use her intended dowry to cover medical school while she works at a call center. Director: Leslie Udwin.

Indias-Daughter_poster_goldposter_com_2

Students in the leadership certificate program get credit for attendance. No restrictions on attendance are listed on the poster. 

 

Entertainment Events Feb. 11-24

February 12;

NOON CONCERT: Philomusica String Quartet. 12:00 p.m. Location: Bedford Concert Hall.

An interesting and diverse range of performances are scheduled each semester including solo and chamber recitals, large group concerts, and lecture/recitals. Free admission and parking.

February 13;

Valentine’s Massage Class for Couples. 10:00-1:00 p.m. Location: Tallent Hall – Orchard Room.

-Supplies: Each couple is to bring two pillows and a thick comforter/sleeping bag to the session. You will be sitting on the floor for the duration of the class. $49 per couple.

February 14

Foreign Film Student Night – Timbuktu. 5:00 p.m. Location: Student Center – Cinema

FRESHINK: Distracted. 7:30 p.m. Location: STUDIO A / THE RITA.

-General Admission = $18; Senior & UW-Parkside Staff = $14; Students = $10

NOON CONCERT: Kal Bergendahl Project. 12:00 p.m. Location: Bedford Concert Hall.

– Free Parking and Admission. No food or drink allowed in concert hall.

@ The RITA: Living Light School presents: “Come Together.” 7:00 p.m. Location: RITA – Bedford Concert Hall

February 21;

FRESHINK: Distracted 7:30 p.m. Location: STUDIO A / THE RITA.

February 23;

Tuesday Night Movie: The Good Dinosaur. 9:00-11:00 p.m. Location: Student Center – Cinema.