Adjusting to UW-Parkside

Tips for transfer students getting used to their new life as a Parkside Ranger

TYLER STEINSDORFER

stein078@rangers.uwp.edu

Transferring schools is difficult: you need to make friends all over, you need to get acquainted with all your professors, and-especially if you are in a smaller major-you get that feeling of being the stranger intruding upon tight knit social grips that have already been established. As someone who has transferred universities themselves – I completely understand that feeling. And that is why, in order to ease some of those feelings of anxiety, I came up with a list of tips to help as you adjust to your new school environment.

Joining an organization

I get it; you probably think that joining a student org is dumb and childish, or you just do not have any time to do so on top of school work. Which is completely fair, and I felt the same way when I was a Freshman and a Sophomore. But through joining an organization at UW-Parkside, I was able to meet some of my closest friends and lost some of the feelings of being an outsider.

Get to know your professors

Contrary to popular belief, your instructors are actually people and have lives outside of their classrooms. Actually go to their office hours (if you can) and talk with them. Not only will they be able to help you with your coursework, but they are also all interesting people to get to know. If you get along well with one of your professors, they may let you do independent research with them, which would both look really good on a resume for getting a job after college or if you want to go on to master’s school.

Talk to your classmates

Your college experience is what you make it. If you just want your college experience to just be going to class, going home, and hanging out with the same friends you had from high school, then by all means go for it. However, if you want it to be a time where you meet new people and form or join new social groups, then you need to take some initiative on your part. Your classmates will not bite, and if anything, are probably as shy as you to start a conversation so they likely will not judge you at all.

Transferring schools can be scary, no matter what level of schooling you are in. Hopefully with my tips though, the transition to being a UW-Parkside student will be a little easier for you, and maybe you will get more enjoyment out of your college experience.

 

From clavichord to piano

Pianist demonstrates a variety of keyboard music on different historical pianos

IMG_3356
Fumi Nishikori-Nakayama performs on various pianos     COURTESY OF UW-PARKSIDE

TYLER STEINSDORFER

stein078@rangers.uwp.edu

On Friday, Feb. 8 at 12:00 p.m., the UW-Parkside Music Department and the College of Arts and Humanities collaborated to put on the first Noon Concert Series of the semester entitled: “Clavichord to Piano: Keyboard Music through the Ages”. The event was led by Fumi Nishikori-Nakayama, an adjunct faculty member of both the Carthage Music Department and the UW-Parkside Music Department. The event was designed to both show different examples of keyboard music ranging from the 17th century to the 19th century and showing the differences in sound between the original instruments they were written for and a modern-day piano.

Instruments and pieces

Nakayama started the event with showing a piece written for clavichord by William Byrd entitled “All in a Garden Grine”. The clavichord is a striking instrument, making it the “grandfather of the modern piano,” as Nakayama described. The clavichord and the next instrument she showed, the Harpsichord, are both instruments used during the Middle Ages. One major difference between the two instruments, however, is that harpsichord is a plucking instrument instead of a striking instrument. Additionally, the clavichord is not designed for projecting its sound for an entire concert hall like the harpsichord.

The other two keyboards that were shown were the fortepiano and the piano. The fortepiano came into usage in the early 18th century and was used until the 19th century. Compositions by Beethoven and Schubert that were originally made for the fortepiano were played on it to give an insight into how it would have closer sounded for the time period. When discussing the sound of the fortepiano, one member in the audience, Patricia Fish, a piano performance major at UW-Parkside, described that “the fortepiano sounds like you’re listening to a piano in a sewer.” What Patricia was specifically referring to when she said this the tone of the reverb of the fortepiano compared to the piano.

This particular entry in the Noon Concert Series allowed for people to be introduced to pieces of music that they may not normally listen to as a way to possibly expand their taste in music. In addition, playing these pieces on their original instruments let the audience get an idea of what the compositions would have sounded like when there originally written.

Come to the Noon Concert series to support artists, to preserve these musical pieces in the modern moment, and to embrace a musical culture that doesn’t usually get the spotlight.

“Bad Genius”: High risk, high reward

Foreign Film Series hits of spring semester with thrill and high action…about good grades

ROSEMARY SCHWEITZER

schwe035@rangers.uwp.edu

Listen up bitches courtesy of imdb
Lynn explains her final plan to Pat and Grace     COURTESY OF IMDB

Cheating. Most students have either thought of, or actually have cheated on some test at some point in their lives. Those slick enough to get away with it can live freely in anonymity, silently gloating at their success. However, those who are caught are not so lucky. Every few years some college board is under fire for recycling test answers, or having too lax of security measures in their testing rooms. Students who get caught up in these scandals have their test results nullified, are punished by their schools and branded with the moniker of “cheater”. Surprising as it may be, organized cheating rings in Asian countries taking advantage of recycled test forms is a constant issue. “Bad Genius” tackles the strange world of Asian cheating rings in an intense, two hour long, heist-style film.

The heist

Teen genius, Lynn (Chutimon Chuengcharoensukying), aids her best friend Grace (Eisaya Hosuwan) in cheating on a test so her grades will be high enough to audition for the school play. Simple enough, and done with good intentions. A one time thing, right? Unfortunately, things get complicated when Grace brings in her boyfriend, who brings in five friends, who all bring in their friends. Suddenly, Lynn is not only one of the two smartest students in school, but she is revered as something of a crime boss, with dozens of students hanging onto her every word and handsomely paying her for her “tutoring” lessons. But what happens when Lynn takes on more “students”? What happens when the tests get harder, the security stricter, the stakes higher?

Not your typical action flick

Unlike many popular heist-style movies, Lynn is the singular mastermind behind the various plots in the film, making her seem unrealistically intelligent, but she is not the only one. Every single one of the people involved in the cheating ring eventually go to pretty extreme lengths to keep from getting caught, though that can partially be explained by how much is on the line for these students.

Also unlike other heist movies, the various characters of “Bad Genius” do not have the familial relationships that many American viewers are used to seeing in films like “Ocean’s Eleven”, “Mission Impossible” or “Fast and Furious 5”. Their relationship is less akin to friendship and is actually closer to a cut and dry business transaction. They remain loyal to each other under threat of getting caught and, not because they genuinely care for one another.

While many of the characters possess more adult attributes, they are still, at their core, relatable teenagers. The teens of “Bad Genius” are rash, self-centered, self-serving, and manipulative in ways that no teen would ever want to admit they are, and yet it is not hard to see oneself in them. There are students all over the world that would go to extreme lengths to get good grades, be accepted to a good school and prove to the adult world that they are no longer just a “kid”. However unlikely as the specific events of this movie may be, it speaks to something that lies deep within most every young adult: the bad genius we all want to be.

Pat and Grace celebrate passing their test courtesy of imdb
Pat and Grace celebrate passing the STIC      COURTESY OF IMDB

Critical acclaim

The film received much critical acclaim, winning seventeen of its twenty-seven award nominations at various national film festivals, and it is not hard to see why.  The film was largely awarded for the stellar acting of the main cast, as well as the direction and editing of the film. Chutimon Chuengcharoensukying (playing Lynn), is a fashion model making her debut to the big screen in “Bad Genius”, and by her performance it is difficult to believe that she is not a well seasoned actress. Likewise, the rest of the cast is relatively new to the feature film seen, but they all present such riveting performances that one wouldn’t notice at first glance.

“Bad Genius” is an adrenaline packed ride of bad decisions and over-complicated schemes from start to finish and a must-see for any lover of thrilling heists or despiser of standardized tests.

What comes after “Be.”

Rory Larson talks after college planning

TYLER STEINSDORFER

stein078@rangers.uwp.edu

Rory Larson is a senior in their last semester at UW-Parkside and preparing to start the
next chapter of their life as a college graduate. Rory is a History major and Anthropology minor with a museum studies certificate. The Ranger News interviewed them about their college experience and plans for after college in order to get insight into how a college student plans on adjusting to life after college.

Deciding degree

Rory described how they had known for years that they had wanted to get their degree in History after spending time working at a museum. “I had started work at a museum when I was in high school and decided I liked history,” they said. They went on to say that they declared a museum certificate due to liking working at the museum that they work and wanting to continue doing so, and they added on an Anthropology minor because “Anthropology and Museum studies had some overlapping classes”.

After college

When asked where they see themselves in 5 years, they said that “ideally, I will be working for a museum or a corporation working as an archivist … Basically filing things, making sure the history and the records … are kept and available for future generations”. Rory got the idea of being an archivist after working at Racine Heritage Museum. As of right now though, they do not have a job lined up for after college, but they plan to continue working at Racine Heritage Museum as of now until they move to Kenosha and get another job there.

They also went on to say that “I was thinking about pursuing a master’s degree but I’m probably going to take a year off in between to save up money and to take more time to consider it.” They described that if they do go back to school, they would either get their master’s in western civilization and history or an associate’s in mortuary sciences. They mentioned that they were pulled to mortuary sciences due to the anthropologist and mortician Caitlin Doughty, who champions death acceptance and positivity.

Rory shows us that college students do not need to have their entire life planned out for them after they graduate; they still have plenty of time to figure out their desired occupation and whether or not they want to further their formal education.

California teachers go on strike

TYLER STRAKA

strak006@rangers.uwp.edu

As seen in the news in the past few years, California’s teachers in the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) have seen a number of issues involving treatment of their teachers and staff, and it has come to a head in early 2019. From a teacher shortage that has worsened throughout the decade to a wreckening pension debt, those in this education system have decided to strike for their needs as of January 14th, 2019. According to CNBC, over 30,000 have joined in the strike, following other states in the process.

Teacher frustrations

The United Teachers Los Angeles (UTLA) is furious with these districts. A statement they made said, “…the district is hoarding 1.86 billion in reserves that could be used to fund the union’s requests, which include a 6.5 percent pay hike and smaller class sizes”. These teachers are also fed up with class sizes, as many have reported they continue to rise with no sign of stopping. The proposal from the LAUSD included a class maximum of 39, but teachers still are not impressed, with classes consistently reaching over 45 students. Ashley Hess reports: “Mike Finn, a special education teacher in Los Feliz, tells USA Today that he has 46 students in one composition class, and calls the conditions ‘unmanageable’”.

Comments

Alex Caputo-Pearl, a teacher in the Compton and Los Angeles area, also wrote of his frustration: “Class sizes often exceed 45 students in secondary schools; 35 students in upper elementary grades; and 25 students in lower elementary grades”.

The strike has made quite a bit of noise, and has received plenty of support from teachers and politicians alike. The president of American Federation of Teachers, Randi Weingarten, showed his support directly at the protest: “The eyes of the nation are watching, and educators … all over the country have the backs of the educators in L.A.”.

These issues of teacher shortages and class sizes have been around for a while, with headlining articles going back to 2016. According to the LA Times: “The staffing problem is both wide and deep, with 75% of more than 200 districts surveyed reporting difficulties with filling positions and low-income urban and rural areas hit hardest”.

Consequences

The overarching worry here is how these practices affect colleges in general. With malpractice in spending and consistent lack of unity between teachers and those in higher standing, colleges in general could be at risk for lack of funding and maintaining reputation.